Black sea delegation in Costa Adeje!

 

A group of councillors from the Bulgarian resort were in Adeje to discuss tourism development ideas

A group representing the Nessebar town council have been in Adeje on a fact-finding tour, and yesterday had a working meeting with members of the Adeje council to quiz them on how this town has evolved into one of the leading European holiday destinations in the last thirty years.

Leading the Bulgarian delegation was Rumen Kulev, president of the local Nessebar council, accompanied by elected officials and departmental heads, with Carmen Rosa González, Manuel Luis Méndez and Zebenzui Chinea representing Adeje at the round table. Also present and open to answering questions from the visiting delegation were Robert Ucelay, president of CEST (South Tenerife Business Circle), Jordi Esplugas (Association of Adeje Commerce and Enterprise), and those responsible for the ExpoVida project, a health tourism initiative under construction in the borough.

The visitors were interested in how the borough of Adeje evolved from its designation as a mainly rural town to embracing tourism in a sustainable manner. They were also interested in issues such as traffic management, and the parallel developments of alternative types of tourism to ‘sun and beach’.

Nessebar is one of the most well-known tourist destinations and seaports on the Black Sea, in what has become a popular area with several large resorts—the largest, Sunny Beach, is situated immediately to the north of Nessebar. It has a resident population of about 12,000, though caters for

Archaelogical studies have confirmed five chronological periods of urbanisation on the peninsula surrounding Nessebar through the end of the second millennium B.C., which included the Thracian protopolis, the Greek colony Mesambria, a Roman-ruled village to the early Christian era, the medieval settlement and a Renaissance era town, known as Mesemvria or Nessebar. Historically the town has, on several occasions, found itself on the frontier of a threatened empire, and as such it is a town with a rich history. Due to the city’s abundance of historic buildings, UNESCO added Nessebar to its list of World Heritage Sites in 1983.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AMTC offer to regional govt

The meeting of mayors and councillors of Canarian tourism boroughs discussed their presence at Fitur

The AMTC, the association of tourism boroughs, held their general assembly in Gran Canaria at the start of the week, with the key point being the presence of the association in the next Spanish international tourism trade fair Fitur, which takes place in January 2019. Last year the AMTC had an independent stand.

Following a number of discussions the association have now decided to negotiate with the regional Canarian government regarding the option of a united presence at the next event. However the suggested unification on a single stand will not mean that the AMTC will lose their individual identity at Fitur, considered one of the most important tourism trade fairs in the international sector. What it will mean, suggest the association, is that agents working in the tourism industry can do so under a united banner.

The meeting also spent some time looking at the issues of holiday lets

Smart Data and new tourism

 

Smart Data was the central theme at the XIX International Tourism Forum this week, held in Benidorm, with the participation of a number Spanish mayors including Adeje’s Jose Miguel Rodríguez Fraga. Also present were mayors from Lloret de Mar, Salou, Torremolinos, Benidorm, San Bartolomé de Tirajana and Calviá, and the Arona councillor for tourism.

The Adeje mayor highlighted what is now being called the fourth industrial revolution, in other words new technologies in communication and information which are affecting and changing the tourism sector. This was also in the context of Adeje’s recent awarding of top points for the Adeje, Intelligent Tourism Destination project at a national level.

The project sees the practical application of new technologies in improving the efficiency of tourism services, and services to residents, improving environmental care and generating an interchange of data to improve the borough in general for everyone. The project deals with everything from rubbish collection to parking, beach occupancy, and water in public showers, etc., in general “the efficiency of public services”, the mayor told the forum. “We are also committed to the reduction of contaminated emissions”, he added.

Following the public session the mayor and Adeje councillor for tourism Ermitas Moreira, took part in a meeting with the national alliance of ‘sun and beach’ boroughs. One of the current priorities of this group is to continue to press for different central funding from Madrid given the extra use of local resources when local populations double or treble with visiting tourists. “Tourists come to Costa Adeje, and to other destinations, in search of a quality time, to be well treated, and we have to be able to offer them top services, but we must be able to offer the same to our residents”. The mayor reminded the administration that the tourism boroughs were “sustaining the principal industry of the country”.

 

 

 

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Adeje’s smart city proposals

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The Adeje DTI (Destino Turistico Inteligente/Intelligent Toursim Destination) project has been given top marks by the national government and the European Union, beating 37 other projects from local Spanish administrations, and meaning the borough will receive a substantial investment from European Regional Development funding and from the national department of finance, from a fund of €6 million.

The presentation dealt with tourist development and innovation in Costa Adeje, which would also see direct benefits for the whole borough, with a planned expansion, through innovative technology, of municipal services. This would improve social harmony and shared used of public spaces by both residents and the thousands of tourists that visit.

Adeje mayor José Miguel Rodríguez Fraga, was the principal mover behind the project though the department of innovation and tourism, but says this positive kind is valued by all local administrations. “In Adeje we have underlined the values generated through tourism, and thanks to that we have seen a related improvement in the quality of life for our residents, with job creation, improvements in services, better infrastructures, and more through this project in the coming years”.

Local tourism councillor Ermitas Moreira explained that they would be developing an ‘intelligent platform’ which would “reorganise the municipal services structure in a more integrated manner, using a way of digitally monitoring public spaces and thus assessing needs for better services, such as public lighting, waste collection, public green space upkeep, parking, beaches, etc.”

Adeje has been working on the project for a number of months as have other Canarian destinations such as San Bartolomé de Tirajana and Puerto de la Cruz. Furthemore, Rodríguez Fraga, as president of the Association of Tourism Boroughs, recently outlined to the national minister for industry, the importance of advancing the Canarian digital agenda, “that we will be among the first to use 5G technology, something that will distinguish us from other tourism destinations in the rest of the world who are competing for similar markets, and that will clearly mark a ‘before and after’ in the technological development of our destinations, creating jobs for hundreds of businesses in the sector”.

Adeje DTI proposes, among other things, ‘smart beaches’, which will use an integrated information technology recording numbers of beach users, the real-time state of services, cost of water in the showers, and other data which can contribute to the improvement of proper quality control of the destination and the resources needed.

The project would also see ‘sensorisation’ of public buildings in the destination to monitor and control C02 emissions. “The reduction of our carbon footprint is also a pledge we have made for Adeje in the coming years. This is a priority for us. As a tourism borough we want to reduce our emissions and optimise the resources we use, which is why we are working to create ways of combatting the effects of climate change too”, commented the mayor.

Among the final objectives of the project, Adeje is also committed to transparency and say the politics of open data will work to encourage the participation of the Adeje public in taking decisions and evaluating local public services.

 

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Supply and demand in a tourist town!

Tourism towns need particular financial considerations

The Alliance of tourism towns in Spain, the AMT, made up of Adeje, Arona, Benidorm, Calvià, Lloret de Mar, Salou, San Bartolomé de Tirajana and Torremolinos, outlined their priorities as the leading tourism destinations in Spain, during a meeting in Madrid earlier this week. Also present were members of the British embassy and consulates.

The eight member boroughs together represent only 0.92% of the Spanish population, but received 13.52% of visitors to the country, 11,059, 430 last year. They have an average occupation rate of over 82% and employ over 86,000 people in the sector. Spain is currently registering as the second best tourism market in the world.

The strong competition in the sector globally and the permanent evolution of the demand of the new tourist are issues of concern for the members boroughs. All are working to digitalise the sector, to continue to grow as sustainable, safe and accessible places to visit, elements that are important in marking the difference between Spanish and many other destinations and maintain their position as world leaders in the sector. To further the aims of the boroughs the group has said they need a specific financial system with increased funding from public administration to put in place many of the new products which will increase their competitive edge. That in turn will continue to see positive returns for the country.

The mayor of Adeje, José Miguel Rodríguez Fraga, says this isn’t just about “asking for money”, but “allocating the tools needed to direct the finance along the lines to alleviate the kinds of pressure that tourism boroughs are under, boroughs that have to deal with a huge seasonal increase in their populations, people who visit not live in the boroughs, but who still require services. Without specific aid, the potential is that the resident population will suffer a parallel decrease in services.

“We are dealing with issues that mark us out from other Spanish boroughs, and as, for instance, there are laws the apply only to the larger cities in Spain, we think it is only fair that we have specific regulations that apply to those boroughs that have a large regular tourism weighting”, insisted the Adeje mayor.

 

The mayor of Arona, José Julián Mena, explained that while “tourism is a source of income and bring opportunities to the residents of our boroughs, we can’t forget that the industry also brings huge pressure to bear on local infrastructures and services”.

He added, “We want to be able to continue to offer both residents and visitors quality public services, but that isn’t easy with pressure from the local population as well as a daily floating influs of about 225,000, people, which is exactly why we need a financial structure that is particular and adapted to the needs here – roads, sanitation and health services, for example.

Also attending the meeting was Bill Murray, Head of Economics and Public Policy at the British Embassy, Sarah Jane Morris, British Consul for Madrid and Alicante and Lloyd Milen, British Consul for the Balearics, Catalonia and Andorra, who are interested in the evolution of this group given the importance of the British market.

During the meeting there was also discussion of worries regarding the question of Brexit and how this might affect tourism. However all were keen to stress the popularity of Spain as a holiday destination with Britons and an overall sense that Brexit won’t have a huge impact on tourism and commerce in that sector.
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Royal praise for three Canarian destinations

King Felipe VI lauds Adeje, Arona and San Bartolomé de Tirajana as excellent examples in the renovation of Spanish tourism

Spain’s King Felipe VI spoke at the Maspalomas International Tourism Forum yesterday (Thursday Dec 14th) and made particular mention of the work of the tourism destinations that are members of the AMT, the Canarian association of tourism boroughs.

His majesty singled out the work carried out by Arona, Adeje and San Bartolomé de Tirajana as excellent examples of how renovation works within the tourism industry. He also met with mayors of the AMT member boroughs and those of Guía de Isora and Mogan.

“Three Canarian boroughs are among the top eight in Spain for overnight tourism stays”, the King told the forum. “These are older destinations how have worked hard to meet the renovation challenge”, he added. Also present were mayors from the member boroughs of the Tourism Sun and Beach Alliance, Salou and Benidorm, an alliance to which Arona, Adeje and San Bartolomé de Tirajana also belong. Among other topics, those in attendance discussed collaborative projects that they are preparing for the next Spanish tourism trade fair, Fitur.

Representing the Canarian boroughs were mayors, José Julián Mena, (Arona), José Miguel Rodríguez Fraga (Adeje) and Marco Aurelio Pérez, (San Bartolomé de Tirajana) as well as tourism councillors from Guía de Isora, Arona, Adeje,, and San Bartolomé de Tirajana,.

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Investment in Costa Adeje could top €260 million

Adeje’s municipal tourism council met today in the Hard Rock Hotel with mayor José Miguel Rodríguez Fraga, and Adeje councillors for tourism and the presidency, Ermitas Moreira García and Carmen Rosa González Cabrera, as well as a healthy turnout from representatives of the tourism sector in Costa Adeje, Ashotel (the provincial hoteliers association), CIT, the centre for tourism initiatives, CEST, the South Tenerife business circle, and other areas working in the sector.

The meeting agenda included a presentation of the different projects currently under way in the zone, and those on the point of beginning work on moves to improve tourism, including plans from the International Tourism Forum and the Atlantic Tourism Laboratory. The meeting also discussed sustainable development plans and the recently obtained Biosphere Tourism Destination certificate granted to Costa Adeje.

During the meeting the delegates proposed a number of plans for debate at insular and regional level regarding connectivity and mobility and the vulnerabilities of the borough. This included a need for discussion on the construction of a second runway and terminal at Reína Sofía Airport in South Tenerife and daily congestion problems along the TF-1 motorway.

The Adeje mayor alongside Ashotel’s Victoria López and the head of the University of La Laguna’s department of economics Francisco Calero, held a press conference where they outlined the priorities for the council. Rodríguez Fraga stressed the importance of plans to improve and upgrade tourism infrastructures in Costa Adeje. He said that in the coming years the amount available for investment in the area could reach €135 million and monies had already been sought from PITCAN, the Canarian Tourism Investment Plan. “We are seeking to insure that public investment matches private funding in the areas of renovation and improvements in tourist spaces, the areas that are the economic bread and butter of the region”, he said. He pointed to the positive effects already felt as a result of modernisation projects adding that it was important that public administrations didn’t get left behind. “We have to renovate and create new environments, modern and attractive, for our visitors”. He confirmed that there was already promises of over €130 million from private investors, so with public funding to match that, overall spending could top €260 million in the region.
The mayor made reference to a number of projects already underway in strategic areas of Costa Adeje, including Calle Roma, Calle París, Calle Uruguay and Calle Paraguay, the maritime walkway in Playa Paraíso and the open area in Salytien. “In 2017 we have already seen spending of €15million, almost all of that council funded”, he said, adding that this meant generating spaces for tourists and residents, those who live here, who sustain our economy.

The Adeje municipal tourism council was established in 1988 and has operated through a number of different tourism development phases. Its primary aim is to recognise and work on the premise that the position of Costa Adeje as a leader in the tourism sector is the responsibility of everyone involved and to work and speak on behalf of the borough in seeking private and public support channelled through participative bodies. During the week the body also explained the incorporation of Adeje into the Canarian Tourism Borough Association and the creation of LAT, the Atlantic Tourism Laboratory, whose objective is development and training in the sector, sharing tourism information and knowledge with all relevant agents in the tourism process. This includes ideas exchange among those involved, and making sure that the lives of those who live here are generally improved.
The council also discussed international issues that affect the industry, looking, for instance, at how some competitor destinations are in a process of recovery, and the economic effects Brexit may have on the market sector given the huge importance of British holiday makers.

Members of the council 2017-2019:

President: José Miguel Rodríguez Fraga (Adeje mayor).
Elected representatives: Rafael Dolado (CIT Sur), Victoria López (Ashotel), Javier Muñoz and Iván Brion (Hoteliers), José Barreiro and Roberto Konrad (Extrahoteliers), Pablo Pastor (Hostelry and restoration, Javier Cabrera (Leisure), Anup Aswani and Jordi Esplugas (Commerce), Roberto Ucelay (CEST), José Gregorio Rivero (Transport), Jil Massow, Carmen Batista, Carlos Jiménez and Alfredo Martínez (Tour operators), Bárbara Waldhorf (Travel agencies).
Proposed spokespersons: Eric Viana, Javier Zamorano, Jimy Gómez, Juan Vallecillos, Jacobo Kalitovics, Santiago Yus, César Álvarez, Lucía Mendoza, José Antonio Mesa, Eduardo Parra, Carlos Ludeña.
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​Adeje approves airport motion

 

At its monthly session today, Friday June 30th, the Adeje council voted on a motion to urge the regional government to tell the state to set in train, as soon as possible, work to build a second runway at Reina Sofia airport. This comes following the seven-hour airport shut down after the tyres on a plane burst on landing earlier this week.

This was what is termed an ‘institutional motion’ with full support from all parties and elected members of the Adeje council and was proposed by the ruling socialists. All those who spoke in favour stated the importance of a second runway and terminal to the area, and included the provision that the regional government offer all necessary assistance to the state in ensuring that this becomes reality.

The party representatives speaking on the issue during the meeting stressed the relevance of the airport as a key infrastructure not just for transport and mobility within the island but also a determining factor in the tourism industry, as the main economic motor of the Canaries.

 

Adeje signs up to sustainable tourism

 

The Adeje mayor, José Miguel Rodríguez Fraga, met with the president of the Institute for Responsible Tourism, the ITR, Tomás de Azcárate y Bang, this week and on behalf of the borough signed an official ‘letter of commitment’ to sustainable tourism. This commitment to the ITR will allow Adeje access tools and communication platforms for the promotion and development of new models of production and tourism consumption favouring cultural diversity, peace and sustainable development within the industry, contributing, says the document, to a world based on understanding and a respect for our social/cultural heritage and nature, that is shared by humankind.

The document also underlines a firm commitment to advance a new model of sustainable tourism. This is to be based on the pillars of cultural diversity and social responsibility, sharing a common future and defining a series of strategic actions which will promote international debate on problems relative to such matters and their relation with the tourism industry as well as social, professional and scientific forums.

“This initiative fits perfectly with the philosophy we have already embraced in Adeje: responsible tourism, tourism for the people. Tourism has to contribute, primarily, to the wellbeing of those who live from it, and following on from that, must open up the possibility for collective enrichment, where individuals are more open, show greater respect”, said the Adeje mayor who added, “tourism is also a great opportunity for our world today, and should be linked to the environment, as well as the society, and promote respect for cultures and ways of life.”

He also stated that “training is fundamental in all aspects, and in tourism even more essential. We are determined to defend the premise that tourism is a source of wealth which we have to see diversify and one that at the same time serves to enhance our Canarian identity”.

Tomás de Azcárate y Bank agreed that people have a key role to play in the evolution of inclusive tourism, “where cultures, traditions and local knowledge is respected in all its forms, as well as valuing the development of ethical and sustainable tourism”.

By signing up to the programme Adeje will contribute to and benefit from an exchange of good tourism practises geared towards the formation of a responsible industry. They will be part of a series of programmes for specialised tourism training and education, using cultural diversity as an essential tourism resource.

The ITR was formed following an international conference on global sustainable tourism held in Lanzarote in 1995, and the body was granted permanent status with the backing of UNESCO in 1997.
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