Costa Adeje Noise Map created

The borough is generally within normal legal limits

Today Adeje mayor José Miguel Rodríguez Fraga presented the results of a study creating a ‘Noise Map’ for Costa Adeje. The map was created over a year-long period by the AAC Acústica + Lumínica company, specialists in this area, and the results indicate “in general we are meeting the quality acoustic objectives”. The mayor, accompanied by the tourism councillor Ermitas Moreira García, explained that this “radio-graph of the acoustic reality of the borough will be a fundamental tool in future urban planning, the organisation of events, activities, etc”.

The Costa Adeje Noise Map, as well as determining whether the acoustic levels are generally within the limits permitted by law, also focuses on two key issues. The first of those is the need to bring the 1994 municipal regulation into line as it is currently “obsolete, and needs be adapted to meet current state and European norms”. The study recommends that a new ordinance “would establish the limits and indicate clearly that measurement of noise and decibel levels needs to be carried out in the buildings where the noise is being heard”.

Furthermore, in the conclusions it is recommended that the new municipal law would identify zones of areas which are designated for leisure and where exceptions can be permitted, such as, for instance, during local annual patronal festivals. At the same time the new ordinance will include the definition of Saturated Acoustic Zones, and the preventative measures needed to be taken.

Tourism councillor Ermitas Moreira commented, “With this information we in the council can now work to draw up the new ordinance the meet the current situation. In parallel we are working via a mayoral pact on the issue of mobility (traffic) to reduce the noise impact in the borough”.

Areas where the noise exceeds limits

The Noise Map did show that noise levels some areas in Costa Adeje are breaking the accepted limits, in many cases due to excess traffic noise. This situation will require the council to create an action plan to improve the situation in these identified zones.

Certain zones are affected by traffic from the TF-1 motorway and urban street traffic. Therefore the study is recommending, among other measures, some work from the regional government (who has responsibility for motorways for instance) to meet their requirements in noise-reduction measures in the areas beside the motorway. Regarding urban thoroughfares, the council is already working under a Costa Adeje ‘traffic and sustainable urban development plan’ to reduce traffic and speed in these zones.

The specific areas were limits were breached included CC Pueblo Canario, points close to the CC Torviscas and the Terraza del Mar, however as the nearest buildings were deemed far enough away from the epicentre of the noise, they were agreed to be within acceptable limits.

In other areas, there was a noticeable increase in noise during weekend nights created by bars or other leisure-related activities but overall the readings are averaged out so there was now general breach of the limits as laid down.


The development of the Noise Map

A year ago the Adeje council, through the tourism promotion department, requested a study to determine the impact to noise in Costa Adeje, the objective being to know the true state of affairs and design a plan of action to improve the quality of the destination. The study was carried out, based on national legal requirements using European standards, to determine noise levels inside and outside buildings.
In line with the national laws, there are three time blocks when noise is to be measured ; from 7am – 7pm, from 7pm – 11m, and from 11pm – 7am (this division did conflict with previous borough practises which divided the 24 hour period into only two blocks, 8am – 10.30pm and 10.30pm – 8am). There are also different kinds of areas for acoustic purposes – health care, educational and cultural, residential, service, recreational and show zones, industrial infrastructures. Measurements were taken over different durations – shorter and longer, up to 15 days in 18 different points – to create the map and suggest recommendations.

 
Department of Communications

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