Adeje takes the reins of the Tenerife South Equality network

The Adeje council is taking on the administration of the Tenerife South Equality network – this is a rotating administration between the participating councils of Vilaflor de Chasna (from which Adeje takes over), Santiago del Teide, Arico, Arona, Fasnia, Granadilla de Abona, San Miguel de Abona, Guía de Isora and Adeje. Adeje will continue the on-going projects the network are currently involved in which are developed to assist the residents of South Tenerife as well as to promote the policies of equality in this part of the island.

Created in 2011, the Tenerife South Equality network arose out of a shared dialogue looking at the positive need for mutual training, orientation and exchange of experiences and good practise in equality-based material and events among member boroughs. The network now works to reflect, with one voice, the needs of the wider community regarding equality.

At the recent meeting of the technical staff handing over the secretarial responsibilities, there was a look at current issues and up and coming matters, projects in the pipeline for this year, including a push for better participation from all the member councils, as well as at regional and insular levels.

Training is seen as a fundamental issue this year, and the nine councils will also be working closely with the teams assigned to deal with children and families as well as the Social Services unit assigned to deal with gender violence.

Last year, among other projects, the network published a guide to good practise for councils in preparing local events and fiestas, “La Igualdad, TU FIESTA”, took part in different forums and facilitated training days in different boroughs. The work of the networks is, in essence, to promote and advance equality between women and men in the path to a fairer balanced society.

 

 

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Safety at sea saves lifes

15 young Adeje students have just completed a couse in life-saving

15 young Adeje people have just completed a training programme under the PFAE programme (training in alternate skills) funded by the European Social Fund “Adeje Azul, Adeje Seguro”, which, following an 11 month training period, has seen them take home their certificate as qualified lifeguards in pools and open waters.

This is a new programme directed by the Adeje council with the European funding and in conjunction with the Canarian employment service. It is designed specifically to meet a demand in the sector (young people between 16 and 30 years of age), and the training was primarily in life-saving skills and safety in coastal areas.

“We actually have three active programme in alternative employment training, Prodintur – with a focus on tourism, Limpur Adeje – cleaning and maintenance services, and Adeje Azul, Adeje Seguro (Blue Adeje, Safe Adeje), and the programmes are aimed at groups of people who might not have found work, for different reasons, without this additional training. We have had an excellent success rate in the past and therefore believe these kind of initiatives do meet a number of needs, rapidly and effectively”, said employment policies councillor, Manuel Luis Méndez Martín.

During the Adeje Azul, Adeje Seguro course the participants learnt life-saving techniques, how to use a defibrillator, basic boat navigation and an English language course adapted to the job of a lifeguard in different situations.

Another training course, a Blue Flag lifeguard course, trains individuals who may be working with special needs bathers. The young people also took part in workshops to improve their self-empowerment and self-sufficiency skills to assist them in entering the labour market.

The course saw participants not just learning the skills directly related to the job in question, but also in related areas, and they trained on the borough’s beaches as well as with the local volunteer fire brigade. The skill set is based primarily on prevention, vigilance, rescue and first aid.

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Adeje updates its training offer

Many of the courses are held in the CDTCA

 

A number of Adeje council departments have been working to update the training programmes on offer to residents to better equip them in learning and access to the labour market.

The full range of courses on offer can be seen on the council’s webpage, www.adeje.es. Courses and workshops range from pastry making to digital imaging, sports, IT, volcanic research, legislation, drones, etc.

The majority of the courses are free and some offer professional certification. To take part or register visit the Adeje Cultural Centre, the Costa Adeje Tourism Development Centre (CDTCA) or the Adeje Escuela de Seguridad y Convivencia (safety and social harmony) to find out more and sign up.

As well as the training courses, throughout the year the council offers interesting talks and meetings on a huge range of topics.

 

 

 

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Healthcare, connectivity, mobility – “not just our problems, everyone’s problems”


In a recent interview with Diario de Avisos newspaper, José Miguel Rodríguez Fraga, Adeje’s mayor, spoke of the changes he has seen in his many years in public service and how tourism has led to unprecedented growth in South Tenerife. “The southern boroughs are beginning to get some recognition – late though that is. However no-one could have foreseen the changes that tourism would bring to the south. And this part of the island has been neglected in three particular areas which now cause huge problems: connectivity, with the problems with Tenerife South airport; mobility, affecting roads and motorways; and health with the on-going demand for a fully functional public hospital in the south to meet the needs of the local population.
“We have other issues, such as water and water treatment and matters that we, as councils, are resolving bit by bit. But in the other regard we are not simply talking about problems that affect South Tenerife. These are Tenerife’s problems, the Canarias’ problems because we are part of a bigger whole. So solving these problems is solving them for everyone. Connectivity, mobility, health care”.
The mayor stated that all three of these mentioned problems indicate a serious lack of planning and that the development of the affected boroughs and areas hasn’t received the kind of attention it merited and merits. “We are operating with a distinct kind of situation whereby we have to be able to provide services to numbers of residents much greater that those who figure on the census. In the case of Adeje, for example, at times we have four times the registered number of inhabitants (due to tourism) and those numbers need to be reflected when it comes to allocating budgets and financial aid nationally, as we are working to meet the needs of up to 200,000 persons who also generate waste materials, need services and have specific and concrete demands”.
On the issue of the airport, and following the 8-hour closure earlier in the year due to a burst airplane wheel, he pointed out, “I am confident that together with the Tenerife Cabildo, the regional government and the other affected council, we can go hand in hand to the national government to state our case. It’s not about nice words nor is it enough to solely consider this worthy of attention when there is a problem. Those of us who rely upon the tourism sector know the urgent need for some solution to this problem, and have been aware of this for many years. A new runway and terminal have to be priorities. At the moment there is no ‘Plan B’ if something happens to close the runway. The airport would have to close causing incalculable damage to the destination. Those thousands who do come here already have to leave their hotels up to five hours before their flight to ensure they arrive on time, given the traffic jams on the motorway. Then they are asked to wait for their flights in a terminal that is not built to deal with to cater for the numbers of passengers who use it daily.”


The mayor was asked to consider the unprecedented transformation of Adeje given the growth of tourism in the region. And given recent protests in certain tourist destinations in Spain it was of interest that he pointed out the council had and continues to hold in equal part the importance of the quality of life of the resident of Adeje as well as that of the tourist. “Many people are involved here, from the companies who chose Adeje as a destination, to the residents of the borough who have worked to adapt and accept the phenomenon of tourism. And from the council we have worked to adjust to ensure that things work in harmony, from meeting the needs of tour operators to the daily needs of our residents, who are so important as we are generating a wealth that is directed towards our people. I do think we have been successful in this regard and we will continue along these lines”.
The mayor also made specific reference to the work done to increase the advantages tourism brings to a local populace, while at the same time protecting the natural environment and the things that mark Adeje out as different. “From the start our principal has been that the resources that have generated such high levels of tourism have to been maintained, looked after. We are also creating employment, generating wealth in emerging subsectors and seeing new job creation opportunities created. We have a low unemployment level (7%) and are a source of employment for many from all over the island and beyond. However we will continue to work to ensure that the distribution of the benefits of tourism is widespread”. The council has worked with the University of La Laguna, for instance, to develop the third level Tourism Degree (two graduating classes to date). “In the coming years we want to encourage more training and specialisation and create more and better opportunities for everyone”, the mayor continued. “Given this economic resource we can create new social opportunities, improve our cultural offer, move ahead in projects that promote social harmony and integration as well as encourage sustainable development on all fronts”.

 

Adeje Tourism degree, class of 2017

Growing interest in establishing new businesses

The Adeje CDTCA (Costa Adeje Centre for Tourism Development) recently ran a course on setting up businesses, with 18 participants, business persons who have recently or are about to establish a new enterprise. The aim of the course, led by specialist Sabita Navalrai Jagtani Jagnati, was to impart basic and important information about being self-employed.

The initiative was the idea of the employment arm of the provincial confederation of businesses (CEOE-Tenerife), with financing from the Canarian Employment service and the European Social fund in conjunction with the Adeje council.

“For quite a while we have encouraged training among the local business community, for us it is very important that entrepreneurs have all the information they need. We are aware of the risks in setting up a new business which is why we decided to offer training in a hands-on manner”, explained the councillor for employment policies and local development Manuel Luis Méndez Martín.

The councillor continued, “Adeje is home to many self-employment initiatives, most of the them successful and the council is happy to help with all new ideas and job creation niches which all contribute to the overall economic and social growth of the borough”.

The 30 hour course offered participants the chance to learn the basic steps of setting up a business, evolving a company schematic, and developing an economic viability plan. Participants were able to bring their own business proposals to the table which included ecological service set-ups, selective recycling proposals, online design and marketing as well as businesses perhaps better known in the borough such as restaurants, florists, shops, etc.

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Helping to maximise business potential

The Adeje council, via the department of economic development and employment, is holding a series of one-off training units to help local businesses maximise their potential. The courses are run under the Impyme Adeje umbrella, which works to help the commercial network of the borough.

The courses will be of one/two hours duration and are designed to help in the presentation of the small business, the products and improve client loyalty. “We believe that these kind of classes, adaptable in content and duration, are of interest to the small and medium business sector locally, and will have positive a effect and help improve our commercial outlets”, said the councillor in charge, Manuel Luis Méndez Martín. “A small business can not only improve their sales, but also their image and relationship with their customers”, he added.

The four units on offer to the sector in May and June will deal with corporative image and package (May 25th, 7pm), merchandising (June 1st, 7pm), window dressing (June 8th, 10am) and shop interiors (June 15th, 10am). Anyone wishing to take part in the courses has to register in advance, and more information is available on www.adeje.es/adejeimpulsa. All courses will take place in the Costa Adeje Tourism Development Centre (CDTCA)

I Executive Programme for the Tenerife Tourism Industry

 

The Hispanic American College, New York, is organising the I Programme for the Tenerife Tourism Industry, in Adeje, from April 24th to 28th. The event will offer participants integrated global-based information on the processes and methodologies in the tourism industry, in particularly those used by leading companies in the sector.

The course is ideal for sector directors, managers and sector heads. Registration is still open online, http://www.hispanoamericanassociation.com/executive-education/executive-program-for-tourism-industry/ where you will also find information about course content and the number of modules offered by the programme. The programme will be in Spanish.

According to Adeje’s tourism councillor, Ermitas Moriera García, “this is an important course which is being run by a highly prestigious university institution”, and further enhances the Costa Adeje Tourism Development Centre (CDTCA) as a training and educational centre for the sector.

The programme is supported by leading hotels in the zone and the provincial hoteliers association. It should encourage debate about the sector and industry, the culture of innovation and partnership in the path to success for companies and individuals working in the sector. How to meet new challenges, how to deal with change through innovation and how to identify potential roadblocks and have a plan of action in place to deal with them are just some of the goals of the five-day event.

Participants will receive a diploma upon completion of the programme. The module leaders are professionals at national and international levels in tourism, marketing, bio-urbanism, consumer identification, health tourism, etc.

 

Debt-free council can invest more in job creation

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The Adeje councillor for good government and finance, Epifanio Díaz Hernández, accompanied by councillors Adolfo Alonso Ferrera and Andrés Pérez Ramos, presented the council’s budget estimates for 2017. The data was proof of the council’s statement that the local economic stability will allow for increased investment in job creation and the overall well-being of the borough.

The main objectives as outlined by the local government continue to be “job creation, improvements in competitivity, innovation, growth and improvement of the tourist destination, training, and above all the well-being of the people of the borough. Our main challenge and aim is to be with and beside the people of Adeje, working to offer the best conditions for growth in the borough, where people can live and develop, this is at the heart of all of our initiatives and plans”.

Prudent financial management has marked recent years, and the surplus, which in 2015 was €18 million, allowed the local government to ensure that all outstanding public debts were paid off and make sustainable investments, and today the borough has no debt whatsoever. Last year’s income gave the council an important margin that Epifanio Díaz explained can be used for emergency situations and for development investments.

Tourism, a key part of the borough

The finance councillor told press that tourism has continued to create wealth and “we are continuing to invest in improving and renovating the local offer, because it is the economic motor that creates wealth and allows our residents a better standard of life”. He stressed that training in the sector is vital and offered through a number of different borough programmes.

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Job training for over 30s

barista

The Adeje council has just begun a new alternative training scheme for 15 people in the over-30 age bracket, who have currently no qualifications, to train and work in the catering industry. Under the ‘Restur Adeje’ plan they will work towards certificates in basic restaurant and bar work, with both theoretical and practical training, in an industry that offers many work opportunities in Costa Adeje.

According to the councillor for economic development, Manuel Luis Méndez Martín, “it’s very important that we provide those seeking work with the right tools and knowledge to enter the thriving labour market here – which is the tourist sector.

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“We know that there is a section of the local population between the ages of 30 and 40 who have few or no qualifications so it is fundamental that they have the opportunity to acquire professional certificates that will assist them in the search for work”, he added.

Given the recent establishment of the Association of Canarian Tourism Boroughs, (Adeje, Arona, Guía de Isora, San Bartolomé de Tirajana and Mogán), with established aims including the generation of social wellbeing from the economic benefits of the tourist industry and the creation of quality employment, it is “imperative that we offer training and specialisation in the production sector”, explained Méndez Martín.

‘Restur Adeje’ will work to improve the levels of employment among persons over 30 who have no professional qualification nor have completed their studies, and will train them as waiters and servers while also helping levels of motivation and knowledge of the sector to properly meet the employment needs of the market place. During their training participants will also work at events organised by the council and by non-profit making organisations that are raising funds locally for those in need.

‘Restur Adeje’ will be taking part in over 50 events during this period. The student workers will combine theory and practical sessions in class and out in the catering sector. Those who complete the course will also be granted a certificate in Basic Restaurant/Bar operations. There will be an intensive two month training period followed by work experience. Students will also take classes in languages, social skills for employment purposes, professional orientation, communication and marketing, etc.

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15 young Adeje students earn their professional titles

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Under the Adejerest programme, 15 unemployed young people from Adeje received their professional certificates in Basic Restaurant and Bar Operations last Friday, upon completion of a course run by the council and the Canarian Employment Service.

Manuel Luis Méndez Martín, councillor for economic development in the borough, congratulated all of the students during a ceremony to make the end of the course. “Over 9 months you have done some extraordinary work. The employment world is waiting to welcome you, and this is a particularly opportune time, with tourism at a high, three new hotels about to open in Adeje…all of the personnel managers are sending us their lists of vacancies, and what is most in demand is the right attitude, as much as experience or aptitude. Make sure you don’t miss this opportunity”.

The project under the Adejerest label saw the 15 young people, between 16-25 years of age and with no previous qualifications work and study over nine months to earn their certificate. In parallel they also received training to increase their employability and job possibilities (including classes in English and the chance to work with a local British volunteer resident group), and the class professors also helped them attain their secondary school diploma. The course cost almost €200,000.