A happy tail!

Volunteers now working in the municipal animal rescue centre

On Friday February 22nd the first volunteer carers began their activities in the Adeje animal rescue centre, with 7 individuals who have met all the requirements needed to be allowed care for these animals. From now on this team of people – which can include up to 3 more – can take responsibility for walking dogs, brushing and shampooing them, playing and training in socialisation, as well as helping during puppy feeds.

The activities that the volunteer team will be involved in will never include the work of the centre’s full time staff, such as preparing the food for the animals, cleaning the installations, administering medicines, etc. Those animals listed as potentially dangerous will always be handled by personnel from the council who are in possession of the correct licences to do so.

Health councillor Amada Trujillo Bencomo, said, “this is a great move for the borough, to have the team of volunteers now active in the centre. This is an important moment for us who have spent time preparing the regulations to allow these volunteers to participate and to ensure the Centre is properly run.

“We have been delighted to engage with volunteers who want to help and contribute to the development of these pets in the centre, a terrific reflection of the kind of people we have, who are ready and willing to take these volunteer duties on”.

Among the requirements for the seven people who have begun their volunteer work, as well as confirming they are over 18, are a medical certificate stating they are not ill, and a judicial declaration stating that they have never been reported or convicted of animal abuse or arrested for mistreating a domestic pet. In parallel they have to officially demonstrate that they are a member of a legally constituted non-profit volunteer organisation which is properly constituted.

The seven individuals have also had to undergo a period of obligatory practical sessions over a month, after which they were presented with an accreditation by the council. Any volunteer can be active for up to a year whereupon they need to reapply, and in this way the centre can ensure that more people who wish to volunteer have the opportunity to do so.

Those who do qualify must commit to at least 50% of the established hours they are signed up for on a monthly basis, carry out the allocated activity in the hours assigned for it and follow the instructions of the responsible personnel in the Centre.

The rules also state that the volunteer may not carry out administrative functions nor access the veterinary area nor play with animals who are waiting to be collected by their new owners, change the cages of the animals, give the animals food or drink, clean the quarters and/or toys of the animals, etc. These functions are solely the responsibility of the staff members of the Centre.

The rules under which the Centre’s volunteers will operate have been laid out in law ‘4/1998, 15 de mayo de Voluntariado de Canarias’ and were approved in plenary session by the council. To apply there must be volunteer vacancy free and the panel will give priority to those who have not previously worked as a volunteer in the Centre, the objective being to allow more people participate. The full regulations are available to consult online, www.adeje.es.

 

Department of Communications

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adeje animal centre welcomes volunteers

 

The Adeje council have given provisional approval to a ruling that will allow volunteers to work in the borough’s animal rescue centre. According to the councillor for health promotion and quality of life, Amada Trujillo Bencomo, “We are making good the promises made at the start of our term of office, that we would welcome volunteers into the centre. We know there has been a call for this from the public and we know too it will make the animals’ lives happier, to have more people in to care for them, befriend them, take them for walks, play with them, etc.”

After this initial approval, the document will be published in the official Canarian statute bulletin, the BOC, with a set time allowed for members of the public to comment and/or present proposals. Thereafter the appropriate regulation will be presented to a meeting of the council for full approval.

Among the duties the volunteers may undertake, though not with dogs registered as belonging to dangerous breeds, will be walking the animals, brushing and showering, play time and care for puppies. The volunteers may also assist in the adoption of animals within the established norms of the centre. However at no time will volunteers be allowed undertake the work of the staff of the centre, such as feeding the animals, administering medication, cleaning the cages, etc. Dangerous breeds will always be under the control of the centre staff who are licenced to handle them. Full rules are available on the council’s website, www.adeje.es

The councillor explained, “this is something we are happy to encourage. Recently we carried out a restructuring of personnel and some improvements in the centre. In 2016 we signed a covenant with an animal protection agency to help in the adoption process. Now we are about to regulate volunteer aid in a move that has the support of all the political parties in the council. We would also like to thank, in particular, Inma Évora, a well-known animal rights activist, for her participation and assistance in this matter.

The document prepared by the Adeje council is based on a 1998 law on volunteering in the Canaries. Among the requirements those wishing to enter the centre to volunteer must be over 18 and registered with a legally constituted volunteer organisation. There will be 10 places open to volunteers and people will be allocated their place for a set period of time to allow others also take up the opportunity. Each volunteer who is granted a place will also be asked to undertake a month-long training period where they will be trained in agreed duties and obligations and then given full accreditation. After one year as a volunteer they must reapply and places will be granted on the basis of availability, priority given to those applying for the first time.

Those individuals who are successfully incorporated into the volunteer team must attend for at least 50% of the agreed times, carry out their activities in the agreed time slots and follow the instruction of the person in charge. As mentioned, there will be certain limits to their involvement; they may not carry out administrative tasks, enter or involve themselves in the veterinary area, change dogs from one cage to another, give food or drink or any medication to the animals, etc. These and other duties will remain in the hands of the official personnel.

The Adeje animal rescue centre was built in 2010 at a cost of over 100,000 euro and is a municipally controlled centre.

 

Department of Communications

 

 

 

 

 

 

Volunteer access to Adeje’s animal rescue centre

Adeje council will soon vote on regulations allowing volunteers to assist in the municipal animal rescue centre

The Adeje council organised a meeting this afternoon (June 15th) to outline and seek reaction to the proposed regulations allowing volunteer access to the Adeje animal rescue centre. The meeting was called by the councillor for health promotion and quality of life, Amada Trujillo Bencomo, with Adolfo Alonso, in the role of council spokesperson, Manuel Luis Méndez Martín, councillor for local development, Oliver Tacaronte, councillor and member of the Coalicion Canaria party and Inma Évora, a well-known animal rights activist. The other political groups represented in the Adeje council were unable, for various reasons, to attend but have indicated their interest in the text of the document which will be sent to them over the following days.

Councillor Trujillo said “we are making good the promise to allow volunteers to carry out some duties in the centre with a series of agreed norms for their benefit and that of the animals in the centre. This will be a partnership which is why we have held this meeting and are open to opinions and reactions. The meeting was very positive and we have taken board a number of suggestions that will strengthen the final document leading towards a better response to the needs of the centre and thus helping the wellbeing of the animals that find themselves there”.

The document prepared by the Adeje council is based on a 1998 law on volunteering in the Canaries. Among the requirements those wishing to enter the centre to volunteer must be over 18 and registered with a legally constituted volunteer organisation. There will be 10 places open to volunteers and people will be allocated their place for a set period of time to allow others also take up the opportunity. Each volunteer who is granted a place will also be asked to undertake a month-long training period where they will be trained in agreed duties and obligations and then given full accreditation. After one year as a volunteer they must reapply and places will be granted on the basis of availability, priority given to those applying for the first time.

Among the duties will be walking the animals, brushing and showering, play time and training geared towards their socialisation, always under the supervision of the centre’s administrator. Other duties would include feeding and care for puppies. The volunteers may also assist in the adoption of animals within the established norms of the centre.

Those individuals who are successfully incorporated into the volunteer team must attend for at least 50% of the agreed times, carry out their activities in the agreed time slots and follow the instruction of the person in charge. There will be certain limits to their involvement; they may not carry out administrative tasks, enter or involve themselves in the veterinary area, change dogs from one cage to another, give food or drink or any medication to the animals, etc. These and other duties will remain in the hands of the official personnel.

The Adeje animal rescue centre was built in 2010 at a cost of over 100,000 euro and is a municipally controlled centre, “from which we care for animals that have been abandoned by their owners, and we have a vet who works with us to mind the animals from the moment they enter the centre. They are given a check-up, and any medication they may require. We also have a team from the council who work at the centre, maintaining hygienic standards, and feeding and caring for the animals as well as carrying out any administrative work needed. The council also has a covenant with an animal protection association who helps in the adoption process with families who will offer the animal a home and love. Our commitment to zero levels of euthanasia is solid”, added the councillor.

Department of Communications