Keyhole surgery for water pipes!

New technology will cut repair time and reduce water cuts

This morning the Adeje councillor for works and services, Carmen Rosa González Cabrera, the director of Aqualia Canarias Emilio Fernández and the head of services for Entemanser Adeje, Francisco Caballo presented a new repair vehicle equipped with the latest technology to detect water leaks via a robot, camera and a linked information system. The new machine, costing €100,000, will service the five boroughs where Entemanser operates and it is calculated it will reduce repair times to a maximum of three hours.

Carmen Rosa González Cabrera remarked, “In a borough of this size it is really important to have a vehicle of this type to work on detecting underground water leaks in the sanitation networks, which in Adeje is up to 153 kilometres of tubing. Thanks to the incorporation of the latest technology the speed with which we can detect leaks is radically improved and we can solve the problems in a much shorter time without causing huge problems for the public with fewer and shorter cuts in supply and service. I would like to extend my congratulations to the company for the investment made in this latest technology for the benefit of all”.

Emilio Fernandez explained to the press, who were invited for a short demonstration, that “this was a stake for Entemanser to access the best and latest in technology for the benefit of the public, improving management of the service, and bettering the time needed to detect and repair a fault in the network. With this kind of technology, when we do detect a leak or any kind of issue in the network we can now fix it without having to dig up the road, thus avoiding more problems for residents. This also means less rubble and a huge reduction in the time taken to resolve the problem. We are also, at the same time, improving the quality of the work of our personnel and their working day as they don’t have to get down into the water network to make repairs, so reducing the risk of any work-place accidents”.

The vehicle is equipped with a television camera designed for underwater work, so that repairs to underground pipes can be carried out without the need for trenches. The design allows the work to be completed within a three hour time frame with little or no damage to the surrounding area nor acoustic contamination. It also means no traffic blocks and in general there will be no water cuts to the general supply either. The vehicle can be parked beside the nearest manhole cover and the work carried out from there. Two operators will work machinery, find the leak, fix it and once complete the vehicle is ready to move to where it is next needed.

Entemanser was founded in 1987 and taken over by Aqualia in 2005. It is the concessionary charged with managing the water supply provision in Santiago del Teide, Guía de Isora, Adeje, San Miguel de Abona and Granadilla. It also operates the desalination plant in La Caleta and manages the water service supply for the private urbanisation in Gold del Sur.

 

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Water and why it matters!

 

The event celebrates the importance of water in the evolution of this society and will be narrated in English and Spanish

This Sunday March 18th the centre of the town of Adeje will stage ‘The Water Route/Ruta del Agua’, now an annual event which is designed to explain the story of the significance of water in the evolution of the local society, the symbolism of and dependence upon this vital resource. As in previous years the route will be led by members of the Adeje municipal folklore group, in costumes of bygone days, acting and explaining, in English and Spanish, the route that water has taken in Adeje over centuries. Participation in the event is free.

According to Adeje’s tourism councillor, Ermitas Moreira García, “the historical riches of our borough are very important and reflect our history as a people, so we think the rescue and valuing of these traditions through projects such as this are of huge benefit, not just for residents for our visitors too. Through different cultural experiences they too can enjoy new experiences and sensations”.

She added, “we are extolling these historic elements that are unique to us as a town and which we can also promote as a tourist attraction. The water route is an excellent example of this”.

The route begins at 11am on Sunday March 18th at the entrance to the Barranco del Infierno (near the Otelo restaurant), and will take the participants on a journey through time, stopping at various old water mills and fountains – the Molina de Arriba, the Fuente de los Tres Chorros, and other historic stopping points in the town. In parallel those following the route will also discover something of the lives of the marquises of Adeje.

During the 19th century liberal politician Pascual Madoz, a member of a progressive party and author of a statistical geographical dictionary of Spain, described Adeje as (translated) “a territory with a sad and monotonous aspect in the valley surrounded by hills; the rest of the area is delightful, with some of the most fertile stretches to be found on this side of the island: water to irrigate the land, the walk knows as the Infierno, which descends from the highest part in the mountains to the canal forming the Barranco del Agua (Water Ravine)”.

During the walk on Sunday participants can delve into details of the borough’s past, which they can appreciate first hand through a series of set pieces created just for this event. Adeje has always held a privileged position in the island, as much in previous centuries as today. The borough boasted the greatest number of springs in the midlands of the island of Tenerife: two in the Erques ravine, three in the area known as El Aserradero, two in the Barranco del Infierno, one at the top of the Barranco del Agua, another at the foot of the Roque de los Brezos and finally one which was by the Roque de Imoque.

The borough was also home to a number of important Guanche (Tenerife aborigine) settlements, and of course to the Gran Tinerfe, a king among Guanches, whose statue now sits at the entrance to the town. Following the conquest of the south and in particular of Adeje, water played a vital part and the hydro-resources from the Barranco del Infierno – the Adeje River – ran from the springs to the sea.

 

 

Department of Communications

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adeje’s water on tap!

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In 2014 100 % of all water samples tested were approved for human consumption

The Adeje Municipal Laboratory, under the department of health locally, has released data alongside its annual report which emphasises the “important improvements in the quality of water in Adeje”. Adeje continues to be borough with the second highest number of tap water controls in the Canaries, just behind Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.

The report underlines that during the whole of 2014 not one single result showed that the water wasn’t meeting all the required standards. Altogether the laboratory carried out 236 analysis of consumer tap water. “Control of the quality of tap waters is a top priority for the Adeje council, as is meeting all the require standards and following the national and regional laws designed to guarantee that water from the taps is apt for consumption, healthy and clean for the people”, the report states. The excellent data is also a direct result of on-going inversion in the waterworks by the council and the water provision service, Aqualia Entemanser, in both the allocation of new installations such as the desalination plant in La Caleta.

The municipal laboratory continues to abide by the Royal Decree 140/2003 which regulates levels of smell, colour, turbidity, conductivity, ph., ammonia, coliform bacteria, e.coli, copper, nickel, iron, chlorine, etc. As well as these indicators, the lab also carries out tests on the water in different channels to determine levels of boron and chlorides.

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Regarding conductivity the tests show a marked improvement since 2008 with levels now below 1000 s/cm, which is considered to be a medium-high level of mineralisation. In Adeje in 2014 the level of water in home taps was, on average, at 250-700 s/cm.

Just over half of the samples tested were taken from private homes and the rest from installations and public buildings or commercial centres. Currently Adeje has 30 supply points, the most concentrated in the Las Torres zone supplying over 26,000 homes. Over three quarters of Adeje’s residents use water from a combination of sources – dams, water galleries, and desalination plants, with the remainder getting their water exclusively from dams and water galleries. And on-going improvements should see a series of improvements to current installations alongside the Aqualia-Entemanser company to homogenise water quality throughout the borough.

Walking with water

ruta del agua adeje I

 

This Sunday, and coinciding with World Water Day 2015 Adeje will celebrate the ‘Ruta del Agua’, or Water Route, which is designed to remind people of the important role water has to play in the past of the local Adeje society.
According to the local cultural councillor, Nayra Medina Bethencourt, “the heritage of the town has many aspects, we can see it on our streets, in the centre of Adeje, in the Convento de San Francisco, the Casa Fuerte (town fort), and the modern Plaza de España, as well as the Barranco del Infierno. This project is under the Adeje Together umbrella, involving the whole community, give the multicultural nature of the Adeje society which has grown in recent years and is directly involved in building the Adeje of the future.”
Anyone who would like to participate in the event, which is free, can sign up at the CDTCA. The starting point is the Plaza de España at 10.30am. During the event people will be able to find out more about the role water played in the development and evolution of Adeje, the borough with the largest number of natural springs in the island. Throughout the centuries water and how it has been controlled and channelled has played its part in the social and political evolution of the area. Find out more on Sunday.

ruta del agua adeje II

Walking with water

 

ruta del agua adeje I
This Sunday, and coinciding with World Water Day 2015 Adeje will celebrate the ‘Ruta del Agua’, or Water Route, which is designed to remind people of the important role water has to play in the past of the local Adeje society.
According to the local cultural councillor, Nayra Medina Bethencourt, “the heritage of the town has many aspects, we can see it on our streets, in the centre of Adeje, in the Convento de San Francisco, the Casa Fuerte (town fort), and the modern Plaza de España, as well as the Barranco del Infierno. This project is under the Adeje Together umbrella, involving the whole community, give the multicultural nature of the Adeje society which has grown in recent years and is directly involved in building the Adeje of the future.”
Anyone who would like to participate in the event, which is free, can sign up at the CDTCA. The starting point is the Plaza de España at 10.30am. During the event people will be able to find out more about the role water played in the development and evolution of Adeje, the borough with the largest number of natural springs in the island. Throughout the centuries water and how it has been controlled and channelled has played its part in the social and political evolution of the area. Find out more on Sunday.

ruta del agua adeje II

Troya clean-up

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The councils of Adeje and Arona have agreed a rota for cleaning up the small area just under the Troya beach bridge along the boundary separating the two boroughs.

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Recently complaints about the green stagnant water under the bridge near the beach led to both councils, technical experts from the boroughs, and the head of the island water department meeting on-site to discuss the problem and look for a long-term solution. While there is some talk of paving the area that would need to be approved by the national Coastal department, but what will happen, effective immediately, is that both councils will undertake to clean the zone, get rid of the green water and solid rubbish, and undertake a weekly maintenance of the zone, probably taking turns on a monthly basis.

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Rafael Dolado, Adeje’s councillor for health and tourism, and Arona’s environmental councillor Antonio Sosa, assured that the water was not sewage, but was coming from garden watering and cleaning of apartments and businesses. And certainly yesterday there were no bad odours from the water. One of the problems is to avoid the accumulation of solid waste being thrown into the water and the councils are also examining the possibility of placing a wire grate over the pond, which would make regular rubbish collections easier.

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The initial cleaning should be happening now, and maintenance should keep the zone clean.

Fit to drink

water tap

Adeje water the most tested in the last 10 years

Adeje carries out more health controls on tap water than any other borough in the Canaries. The most recent studies meet all the European directives regarding tap water and show that the water is perfectly safe to drink.

According to the Adeje councillor for sanitation, José María Álvarez Acosta, the tap water in the borough can be classed as ‘good or very good’ depending on the area. The data published is part of a study carried out by the Adeje municipal laboratory and the Aqualia Centro company. The conclusions were that Adeje’s water is now apt for human consumption.

Álvarez Acosta confirmed that “the proper quality control of water in homes is our main objective here in the Adeje council. We will continue regular analysis and continue to meet all the European standards as well as national and regional norms. In that way we can guarantee that our water is clean, healthy and apt for consumption”. He confirmed too that “Adeje was the second most tested zone in the Canaries in 2013 and the most tested over the longer period of 2004 – 2013. The most recent date comes from the sixth control report carried out in Adeje”, the councillor continued.

Adeje uses water from two desalinisation plants, one in La Caleta and the other, shared with Arona, in Las Américas. Councillor Álvarez said that recent work had also seen the water pipe network improved to guarantee the quality of water arriving into Adeje’s homes.

The borough’s laboratory, which meets all of the EU standards, was opened in Adeje in 2007, has dedicated a number of studies to improve the quality of water in Adeje. “Today we can stand over the claim that we are a leading borough in the treatment, desalinisation, and quality of infrastructure dedicated to water consumption”, he said. Water is tested using a number of parameters, including smell, taste, colour, conductivity, pH and turbidity levels, ammonia, bacterial content, presence of e coli, presence of minerals such as copper, iron, nickel, residual chlorine and boron.

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The laboratory uses a national programme for control and analysis of tap water, in place since 2007. The controls were carried out in homes and public and private installations using the public water system. 65 per cent of the residential population of Adeje receive water sourced from dams, the island’s natural water galleries and from the desalinisation plants, with the rest of the homes in receipt of water sources exclusively from dams and galleries.

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Water, Water Everywhere…

water plant works

Over 6.5 million Euros has been invested in the sea water desalination and purification plant in Las Américas meaning a significant increase in the amount of water processed daily.

The investment was part of a joint project by the Adeje and Arona councils and the Tenerife Cabildo as part of the regional Canarian State Covenant. At a press conference to announce details of the improvements Adeje’s Gonzalo Delgado Díaz and Antonio Sosa for Arona joined Tenerife Cabildo president Carlos Alonso and the minister for water Jesús Morales in the installation beside the national police station in Las Américas.

Gonzalo Delgado told press “81% of the water consumed in Adeje is desalinated, and of high quality. We are planning to reach 91 % of the population within a year with the improvement works that are being undertaken and an upgrade to the drinking water network financed by the Adeje council.
“At the moment the Adeje-Arona desalination plant supplies our borough with about 5 million cubic metres of water annually, which, added to the 3 million cubic metres produced by the plant in La Caleta, gives the 81% coverage I mentioned. We can say that, unquestionably, Adeje has the best quality water in the island.”

The Tenerife president and the minister for water commented on the scheduled works that would mean important energy savings and improvements in the quality and quantity of water processed in the Adeje-Arona plant.

water plant

In the last year, with the investment, the production of desalinated water increased to a daily average of 22,991m3, with a significant increase of the last 12 month period. The plant has been in operation since 1998 and has a current daily capacity of 30,000 m3, up from 10,000m3 when it was first opened. It serves Adeje and Arona, mainly in the tourist zones and along the coast.

The recent improvements to the plant included:
• Upgrades in the energy efficiency of the desalination process
• Remineralisation via filters
• Reform of the pump station in Parque de la Reina (linked to the Adeje-Arona unit)
• Introduction of a mixed rack conduction system dealing with desalination, regeneration and sanitation of sea water.

Regarding the operation of sanitation and purification energy saving pumps are being installed using variable-frequency drive (VFD).
Further investments are also planned in the pump station in Parque de la Reina which will facilitate water conduction up to Llano del Camello and Las Chafiras and the coastal areas of San Miguel de Abona.

water plant installation

Top Water Quality

drop of water
Adeje has been working for a number of years to improve the quality of water in the borough, and the water that reaches our taps comes from both the island’s natural water galleries and the desalination plants here in the area. The council has also been working with the locally based company charged with improving the quality of the water and today, says the councillor for works in Adeje Gonzalo Delgado, Adejeros can count on top quality water.
The ongoing system of vigilance led to the detection of boron in a number of isolated cases last month, all of which have been resolved. In fact, according to regional comparisons, Adeje carries out the most controls of tap water of any of the Canarian boroughs, checking a number of factors including smell, taste, colour, ph balance, bacterial presence, fluoride, nitrates, etc. With the opening of the desalination plant in La Caleta in 2011, in addition to the Adeje-Arona plant already in operation, the quality improved further. In 2012, says Delgado, there were 320 separate inspections carried out, 57.26 per cent of them in private homes, and 42.7 per cent in public and commercial spaces, and according to the results published by the National Water Consumption Information System all the water in Adeje is apt for consumption.
Beaches
The Municipal Laboratory also carried out controlled studies on the water quality in the borough’s beaches, important for maintaining blue flag status, as well as for consumers, with highly satisfactory results, with the sea water by Adeje beaches of “excellent quality”, so good news for bathers.